How To Get a Job With a Contrarian Investor

I haven’t blogged consistently as much as I would have liked to in the past few weeks. However, as I started writing the answer to a question asked on www.showmedamani.com/ama, it went from a short form answer to a full-blown blog. It was the best trigger to restart my daily blogging habit.

The question asked: How can I learn more about investing? How can I get a job with a marquee investor?

The first question to answer is, who is a marquee investor?

A marquee investor is someone that consistently beats the market over a long period. Anyone that has invested for a living will tell you that beating the market is not easy; therefore, the select few that do, do it by refusing to follow the market. These investors few enter (or exit) investments against market sentiments because they figure out that the market has mispriced a stock, sector, instrument, etc.

Investors that invest against the market sentiments get branded as contrarian investors.  I consider myself to be one too.

I  understand why finance or investment professionals want to learn from contrarian investors, and it isn’t about the money.

Contrarian investors represent something far more significant, the ability to speak up (through their investment decisions) against the majority and – win. At its very core, contrarian investing is the classic underdog favorite story of David vs. Goliath.

It isn’t a surprise many contrarian investors get bombarded with requests for “ability to learn” from them. What is surprising (to me) is how individuals that want to emulate contrarians do it by approaching them conventionally. They send resumes with cover letters praising the portfolio picks, but their resumes and praises get lost in a pile of many deserving candidates.

So how can a candidate stand out?

The biggest challenge for contrarians is to find people that want to challenge the status quo. It takes a lot of guts to develop a contrarian thesis and an even stronger constitution to hold onto that belief. Contrarian strategies look incorrect for a long time before they look correct, and a contrarian can lose employees, friends, family, and investors by holding onto that belief.

Michael Burry’s predicament in The Big Short is an excellent example of how lonely (and frustrating) it can be as a contrarian holding onto their predictions.

Therefore If a candidate wants to showcase that they can think, act, and hold onto contrarian views, it shouldn’t it reflect in their attempt to seek a job?

Here is an exciting approach that I thought of (and could work on me, possibly):

  • Study your target investor’s thesis and learn how they pick their investments.
  • Try to find the next investment that would excite your target.
  • Prepare an in-depth investment recommendation note for your target.
  • Your note should highlight your ability to research, analyze, model, and recommend.
  • But it should showcase your nonconformist approach to investing, the ability to find information where no one is looking.
  • Most importantly, it should put it on display that you do not think about where the ball is right now, you think about where the ball is going to be.
  • Send that note to your target with a detailed cover letter explaining why you chose the investment you did and how you went about your process.
  • If you have gone a step ahead to tie up the investment for them too – major brownie points.
  • Most importantly: do not ask your target for a job or an opportunity to work with them. Just ask them for feedback on your investment note.

This approach requires effort. However, if one wants to run ahead of the crowd, like Usain Bolt, they must practice harder than everyone else too.

6 Learnings after 60 days of WFH – for Founders

Yesterday was the 60th day since we shut down our office, but it feels much longer. Partly because of the roller coaster journey I have had with a concept that I could not understand, i.e., working from home. In the last 60 days, I have gone from hating to loving the work from home concept and from working myself to the bone to appreciating the freedom and higher productivity this concept brings to my team and to me.   

There are several posts on how to manage employees that are working from home, but very few focus their attention on the founder that is leading their startup through troubled waters. I had 6 distinct learnings that reshaped the way I thought about working from home: 

 

 

  1. Hyper-productivity has its limitations 

    I was guilty of indulging in this mistake for the first 30 days. Theoretically, I saved 90 minutes of commute time; therefore, I decided that I could take on more tasks and responsibilities. Thus, in addition to my duties as a fund manager, I was reworking budgets with our portfolio companiestook on the chief editor role for Artha’s blogs, and I was conducting multiple team calls a day to keep the team focussed and engaged. 

    It was exciting and new the first couple of weeks, and I enjoyed working myself to the point of exhaustion because it kept all the negativity around the crisis out of my mind. However, hyper-productivity began providing diminishing returns the more I indulged in it. 

    It started with general irritability and slight distractions, but eventually, the focus on work suffered, and the list of tasks pending on me started to pile up. Finally, there was just a general numbness to all the work. The enjoyment of completing one task was quickly replaced by the groan of watching the tasks list continuing to expand

    became aware of the toll my hyper-productive avatar was having on my physical and mental health. Eventually, it started affecting my interpersonal relationships – at work and at home. With some sage advice, I toned down my hyperproductivity ambitions and focussed on quality instead of quantity. I concentrated on completing 5 tasks per day (nothing more or less) and utilizing the extra time to expand my knowledge horizon.

  2. Recognizing and dealing with Zoom fatigue 

    It was fun to be on an endless stream of Zoom calls. The meetings were shorter, I drank fewer calories, and I could do double the number of meetings. Then as Brad Feld put it, I started to experience Zoom Fatigue. I caught myself replying to emails, responding to internal team chats, or editing investor newsletters during these online meetings. I was there, but I was not present

    It did not help that I made my meeting schedule so tightly packed that there was no room for error; therefore, if there was an unscheduled call, it would be a couple of days before I could get back to them. 

    At the start of this month, I reduced the time I allocated for online meetings. Encouraged with the results, I have limited my online meeting schedule to just 3 hours a day from this week. This workaround will give me ample down-time to catch up with my inbox, tasks, and team chat – allowing me to be fully attentive during the online meetings 

  3. Taking a break 

    It is ironic that I would find it challenging to take a break from working while working at home. The opportunity to take a break (my TV) is less than 10 steps away, the bed just another 15 steps. Despite my intense working schedule over my 15year working career, I continued to watch at least 1 new movie a week on averageHowever, in the last 9 weeks, I have watched a grand total of 2 new filmsand I had to split watching each one over 2-3 weeks. 

    The fact that the opportunity to take a break was so close developed a false sense of comfort that I could take a break at any time. That time did not come because there was always something pressing that needed my attention.  

    Although it was late, the benefits of taking breaks finally dawned on me. A couple of weeks back, I took a 3-day weekend (I still ended up working for half a day), caught up with friends, and on my sleep. I had a fresh perspective on projects & a spring in my voice when I resumed work, convincing me that taking a break is an imperative undertaking for any founder.

  4. Setting boundaries 

    When we are done with work, we shut our laptops, stuff them into our bags, we commute back home, switching off all the work-related tabs in our minds and refreshing the tabs for our personal livesWhat happens when that commute is cut down to 90 seconds? 

    In my first month I was taking work calls from 8 am to 10 pm daily, I slept with work and woke up in it. There are several times in a year when VCmust put in those types of hours, especially when we are closing multiple deals. However, this was different.

    I did not have time to work out, I took tons of notes with a mental promise to review them but could not find the time to do it. Many a time, I could not remember what I ate for dinner and in what quantity! These endless hours started to take a toll on the team as well.

    I instituted a pm deadline on myself for all workrelated meetings. Everything that could not get completed by 7 pm would get pushed to the next day. To commit myself to this deadline, I started working out on cure.fit with a partner who would ensure that I did not miss workouts, therefore, ensuring that my work-day had an ending

    Without boundaries, the boon of working from home can quickly turn into a curse. Therefore, it is a good idea to schedule winding up and winding down activities so that there is a psychological boundary between work & home. 

  5. Schedule tasks into your calendar 

    There is a big difference between being busy and being productive. One can be busy all day but have nothing to show for their busyness at nightOn the other hand, productivity demands results, it demands focus.  

    I learned an excellent productivity hack that has worked wonders for me. Instead of having a to-do list or a task list – I get my tasks directly scheduled into my calendar, thereby blocking out time to focusThe scheduled slots are limited to 30-45 minutes chunks, with a 15-mins break at the end for contingencies and to report to the team after the job assigned to me is completed. There is an excellent post on Effective Scheduling for more on this. 

  6. Take a vacation 

    It sounds ironic that I would propose vacation time amid an economic crisis, especially when we are working from home! However, a lot of founders have forgone summer vacations due to the way this crisis creeping upon us. As a founder, we must recognize that vacations are essential with several scientifically known benefits of what breaking routines do for our minds & bodies

    While there are minimal options for us to travel for a vacation, there are other ways to take a break from the world and give the body & mind time to recharge their batteries. The Washington Post provided an excellent resource for vacationing at home, aptly titled, The completely correct guide to vacationing at home.

    Oh! You will find the perfect vacation auto-response in my 18-month-old postPerfecting the vacation auto-response.

Summarizing my exit interview with a venture capital intern 

Two interns finished their learning cycle with Artha this week. One of them wanted to speak to me and get my feedback on his performance during his 4month internshipThe schedule short feedback session went on much longer, and at the end of it, we got into an exciting topic – the importance of forming an opinion.  

I believe our discussion applies to anyone who wants to work in the investment business, especially earlystage venture capital. I am sharing a synopsis of that conversation with the permission of the intern.  

 

Intern: What is one piece of advice for me? 

Me: Form an opinion and be vocal about it. It is acceptable to be wrong, completely wrong, and heinously wrong. However, it is cardinal mistake to have the ability to accumulate and analyze data but lack the courage to form a decisive opinion. The best investors have often sought out views from their peers and from people who could provide them with a fresh perspective. In fact, the investors I emulate often seek out contrarian views to their own to test their hypothesis.  

 

Intern: Why is the trait of forming and communicating our opinions so important? 

believe that investing is the ability to predict future outcomes of current decisions, and an investor’s brilliant foresight finds appreciation only in hindsight. That is why I consider investing more of an art than scienceA room full of experienced appreciators of art would almost inevitably have deep-felt disagreements on the value of Van Gogh. They could all be right or be wrong – we would only find out once the money gets transferred into the sellers account 

 

What should an intern do?  

fondly remember eyeopening realizations I have had during discussions (sometimes heated) with interns, associates, principalspartners, coinvestors, and even entrepreneurs over the last 10 years in venture capital. Initially, it was intimidating for me to showcase my opinions in front of the experienced hands of this game. But I realized that I wasnt learning anything by keeping them to myself. I learned more by expressing my incorrect opinions and recognizing the gaps in my understanding, over keeping my opinion to myself for fear of getting called out.  

A newcomer to the investment industry should seek out experiences where they can form these opinions. Join investment clubs, seek out investors who have strong opinions, even if they are contrarians to their own, but learn how to build and present your investment viewpoint. 

 

Don’t be afraid of being wrong; we learn best through the mistakes we make. Expressing your opinion is a win-win situation. You either get called out and learn where you went wrong, or your opinion contributes valuably to the discussion. Most importantly, you grow with each interaction and learn to receive constructive criticism. 

Be The Best Of Whatever You Are

It is increasingly clear that India will get back to work in the next 2-4 weeks. However, it won’t be business as usual. Some will get back to work earlier than others. Many of us will be out looking for jobs as the companies we worked for will try to rebuild themselves without us. The road to recovery will be long and hard, but each of us will have an important role to play as we help rebuild the economy.

The biggest lesson we’ve learned from this lockdown is that we are more resilient and self-sufficient than we give ourselves credit for. Another big lesson we’ve all learned is that when we are faced with impossible odds, the best response is to act – don’t stop to dwell on spilled milk.

There is a beautiful Douglas Malloch poem that I read in How to Stop Worrying and Start Living written by Dale Carnegie that captures the essence of that I would like to convey to those that are getting ready to get back to work or to look for a job:

 

If you can’t be a pine on the top of the hill,

Be a scrub in the valley — but be

The best little scrub by the side of the rill;

Be a bush if you can’t be a tree.

 

If you can’t be a bush be a bit of the grass,

And some highway happier make;

If you can’t be a muskie then just be a bass —

But the liveliest bass in the lake!

 

We can’t all be captains, we’ve got to be crew,

There’s something for all of us here,

There’s big work to do, and there’s lesser to do,

And the task you must do is the near.

 

If you can’t be a highway then just be a trail,

If you can’t be the sun be a star;

It isn’t by size that you win or you fail —

Be the best of whatever you are!

Silver linings: Lighting up a revolution (with a pair of binoculars)

I am continuing on the same thread upon which I wrote last week, i.e., Finding Silver Linings in this lockdown.

Yesterday we completed 40 days of working from home. Amongst several pivotal moments that define the turning points for Artha, sparking off a blogging revolution is definitely the most satisfying one.

For a very long time, I tried to convince my team to start blogging. I tried several approaches, showed them how my own blogs helped me express myself creatively and develop a robust network & following. However, the fear of getting criticized publicly made the team members shy away from expressing themselves – whether I offered them a carrot or the stick in return.

I could have got their blogs ghostwritten, but I wanted our blog to be genuine expressions that resonate. After several frustrating failed attempts, I threw in the towel. I stopped pushing the team to write because even when they wrote blogs due to the fear of disappointing me, they were half baked as the attempt to writing them was.

Then the lockdown took place. With commute times dropping to a few seconds from the hours endured earlier, a few members decided to utilize the extra time to creatively express themselves.

As the editor to our blog pages on Medium, any team member that completed a blog for publishing would assign a task to me. I had to review, make final edits, and approve their blog to publish from our Medium publications. Most of the time, it would be weeks, and even months before I would see assigned tasks in my editorial bucket. But things changed quickly.

Within the first week of working from home, I got notifications that I was assigned 2 blogs for publishing! This is interesting, I thought.

The first blog was published on Artha Venture Fund’s blog page. Farhan wrote a playbook for anyone that wants a VC job, i.e., Breaking into VC.  He frankly shared his personal journey of hounding my inboxes until he got me into meeting him face to face. He impressed me enough with his enthusiasm to secure an internship at Artha. With a foot in the door, Farhan converted the opportunity into a full-time role.  Farhan offered his playbook as a model for others to emulate. His post received a fantastic response with 300+ views in 3 days on our otherwise dormant blog page.

Unbeknownst to me, Deepanshu wrote and published a fantastic blog while sitting on his la-z-boy chair at his home in Delhi. Deepanshu’s take on the new work paradigm aptly called Corona: Ghar se Kaam KaroNa, We did it, did you? got published at the appropriate time and it lit up the Artha India Ventures blog page on the same day that the AVF blog saw a massive spike in its activity.

Farhan & Deepanshu’s unrelated but perfectly timed efforts sparked off a content creation race in Artha. They (thankfully) weren’t shy about the attention that their blogging debuts brought to their LinkedIn inboxes. It made others jealous and smashed the glass ceiling that kept the team from expressing themselves. All of a sudden, every person at Artha was lining up to write whether it was partners, principals, legal associates, junior analysts, even our interns!

There was so much content to review & publish that our internal PR team had to put everyone on a publishing calendar. Every team member got assigned 1 day a week to post their efforts on the company blog. I blocked out an hour a day to review the final drafts before publishing. But when I look at the list of blogs waiting for my review, even a couple of hours a day will not do justice.

In the end, I learned a valuable lesson. The thrill of competition drives a person harder than the fear of retribution. I tried igniting a creative explosion within Artha with the right intentions but the wrong strategy. Eventually, the age-old tactic of replacing my stick with a pair of binocular to keep up with the joneses got me to my long-held goal of creating a thriving blogging culture at Artha. That is a silver lining for me to cherish!

Here is the list of the 25 blogs we have published on our blog pages in the last 33 days

Date Blog Name Author
24-03-2020 Breaking into venture capital: A brief playbook Farhan Merchant
24-03-2020 Corona: Ghar se Kaam KaroNa, We did it, did you? Deepanshu Sidhanti
27-03-2020 From Polo to Venture Capital Dhruv Thadani
31-03-2020 21 Point Action Plan to Corona-Proof Your Startup Dream Anirudh A Damani
01-04-2020 Book Review: ‘Start with Why’ by Simon Sinek Gauri Kuchhal
02-04-2020 Humanity First: Hyderabad Man Distributes Free Food Outside Hospital Sandesha Jaitapkar
04-04-2020 3 Takeaways After Evaluating 200 Startups Farhan Merchant
07-04-2020 Book Review: ‘How to Stop Worrying and Start Living’ by Dale Carnegie Gauri Kuchhal
07-04-2020 Week #14: What are our investee companies doing this week? AIV Team
10-04-2020 Silver lining in the dark cloud — Looking up after 22 days of home arrest Shweta Tripathi
10-04-2020 From selling my startup dreams to buying into the startup dreams of many more like me Deepanshu Sidhanti
13-04-2020 MERC Listens — Part 1: Impact on Industrial & Commercial consumers Animesh Damani
15-04-2020 5 things I have learned after 365 days in Venture Capital Dhruv Thadani
17-04-2020 Gordon Ramsay Would’ve Been a Top Tier VC Farhan Merchant
17-04-2020 Flashback Friday: My first startup investment — United Mobile Apps AIV Team
18-04-2020 Week #16 Investment Update: The coming of age for Farm to Fork startups? AIV Team
20-04-2020 Finding silver linings Anirudh A Damani
21-04-2020 My experience of lockdown & work from home Piyali Das
22-04-2020 Book Review — ‘The 21 irrefutable laws of leadership’ by John Maxwell Gauri Kuchhal
21-04-2020 Drawing parallels. Similarities between parenting and investing in early-stage startups Deepanshu Sidhanti
23-04-2020 Impact of the lockdown on the power sector Animesh Damani
24-04-2020 Work from Home — Boon or Curse? Aakash Javeri
24-04-2020 Flashback Friday: CarveNiche Technologies Anirudh Damani
25-04-2020 Week #17: AIV expands funding to SEA AIV Team
27-04-2020 10 things I learned from my 5-year startup journey — Executive Assistant to COO Sandesha Jaitapkar

Help us help you get that business partnership you want!

During my door to door salesman days, I could go through a wall if that meant I would get a referral to a potential sale. My team and I created, and memorized closes to secure referrals. My managers and I tracked how many transactions took place from referrals, and we pulled up salespeople that had low referral closes. It is clear to any salesperson that a referral is worth its weight in gold – it is a job half done.

Continuing in the same vein, now more than ever, founders are on the lookout for business partnerships to increase business avenues, and you must know that your investor has access to a vast network of people. Your investors’ immediate network has access to an even more extensive network, i.e., your investors know some people that know some people who are very important people.

So why is it that most founders fail at utilizing our reach?

A majority of the investors have every intention of helping you, but here is another critical question.

Have you made it easy for us to help you?

Despite best intentions (and regardless of the size of the fund or team), we have a limited amount of time and resources to address the needs of founders. A little bit of help from you would make it easy for us to help you. Your help would help us get more done in a shorter time and make you and us happy.

Therefore I came up with a list of steps, distilled from my efforts in securing referrals, whether it be for investors into our fund or for business development. Besides, I analyzed the efforts of founders who got the best out of their investors and those that failed at leveraging them, and the result was more straightforward than I would have envisioned when I began writing this list.

  1. Self-research on your target connect.

Venture capitalists have thousands, if not tens of thousands of contacts, and we are very adept at networking and finding people. However, you need to do your research on the people you want us to connect you with.

Usually, your reason to connect with the target is very different from why (or how) we connected with them. Our personal experiences could bias our opinion with your target, i.e., we could have approached them to invest in our fund, and they refused?

Therefore you should do your research on the target, utilize our knowledge about them to sharpen your understanding and find out whether an association with your target would be fruitful.

  1. Be as specific as you can in what you seek

It is a known fact that the most sought after people have the least amount of time. It is likelier that those people have an even shorter attention span. Therefore you must grab their attention, deliver your request before a notification takes your target onto another window.

Therefore avoid long-winded emails and big paragraphs, write in point format, be specific and get to the point quickly. When you show respect for your target’s time (and attention), it speaks volumes about how well you understand their position.

PS: Do not forget to be courteous & spell check!

  1. Know ‘why’ would your target want to work with you

If you or your company is the ultimate beneficiary of your proposal, expect a long period of silences to your requests. You must find a win-win situation and communicate how your association with the target would benefit the benefits them directly or their company.

If you cannot find or demonstrate the benefits of the association for the target – why would they get out of their chair to help you?

PS: If your strategy is to appeal to your target’s charitable side – please find a better reason.

  1. Create a short presentation (or note) on your proposal

After analyzing 40 million emails, Hubspot reported that emails with less than 200 words had the highest response rates. It is sage advice.

It is an excellent chance that your target receives hundreds if not thousands of emails in a week. Your warm introduction through us would encourage the target to etch out time to respond. However, long emails get flagged for reading when we have more time. Which (in most cases) I don’t.

There is a hack, though:

  • Create a short presentation (5-8 slides max) that outlines your research on your target, defines what you do, what you can do for your target, and how your proposal creates a win for the target.
  • Your presentation should excite them to get in touch with you (or get the relevant person from their team to get in touch with you)
  • Write an interesting note that generates enough excitement for the target to open your presentation.

  1. Get your investors’ buy-in.

Once you have found a win-win, written an action invoking short note to go with a presentation that will get you a callback, next, get your investor’s buy-in.

Some founders treat their investors as gofers who should do the founder’s bidding regardless of the investor buying into the proposed plan. You must understand that it takes much effort to create and cultivate relationships. Just one poorly-thought-out request could ruin that relationship for the foreseeable future.

If we get bought into your well thought out plan, and you can convey how we could enrich our relationship (with the target) through your proposal. You would’ve created a win-win-win that will get us to go those extra miles for you.

  1. Write a short, courteous but direct introduction email to your investor asking for your specific help from the target

With your investor bought in, write a quick introductory email asking for a specific connection to your target utilizing the steps outlined above. Your email must convey that you were specifically looking for an introduction to the target (and why).

Emails that convey a spray & pray approach get treated as spam.

  1. Draft the email for your investor

For extra credit (and to ensure that your message isn’t lost), go ahead and write the email that your investor could copy, paste, as their own words, and forward the email you sent in step 6.

It is unlikely that your words will get copy-pasted in the form that you’ve sent it in. However, your words will load our words when we write our email, thereby ensuring a near-total control to you on the messaging.

PS: It won’t take but an extra few minutes, but knowing how busy and dynamic an investor’s day could be, you leaving anything to chance is foolhardy.

  1. Give them a way out

Your target must have a courteous way of saying ‘no’ to your investor. I have explained before that each relationship takes much effort; therefore, the target’s failure to help you through your investor should not lead to a loss of the connection itself.

We want to help you, but if that means it puts our relationships on the line – it isn’t the sort of song that you wish to play in the back of our head.

PS: Give your investor a way out too. You can utilize this forgiven favor soon! 🙂

Finding silver linings

The history of sports and wars is replete with moments of inspiration. The odds are stacked up against the underdog. Out of nowhere, there is a moment of inspiration. The narrative gets altered, the game has a new direction, and an inevitable defeat morphs into an unlikely victory. I’ve previously spoken about the similarities between entrepreneurs and athletes; therefore, it is a given that such pivotal stories show-up in the lives of entrepreneurs and venture capitalists too! It happened during this month.

We shut our office on 18th March, i.e., 32 days ago. I was jittery about the future. The world was teetering at the brink of collapse, our fundraising plans got thrown off its rails, and by the time we shut down the office, moved everyone to work-from-home it wasn’t clear if our portfolio (or we) would emerge floating or underwater (pun intended).

The weekend before the shutdown, we had had a riveting offsite that was chill. But as we rapidly shut down, there was an air of discomfort, even a distrust that whether our goodbyes were temporary or final. I could see that my people were in different stages of depression as they slowly trudged out of Artha’s Coruscant. The moroseness over the collapse of the world started making inroads inside the strongly guarded walls of my work universe.

It was serendipity that while my work world started to spin out of control, I was reading a Dale Carnegie’s, How to Stop Worrying and Start Living. In chapter 6, How to crowd worry out of your mind, Dale talks about the importance of replacing worry with activity. He says:

We cannot be prepped up and enthusiastic about doing something exciting and feel dragged down by worry at the same time. One kind of emotion drives out the other.

In my context, the critical part was to discourage my people from dwelling in the bleak future and get them to start acting. I put up a schedule full of activity for the team (and myself), we took on new opportunities, and we began to collaborate multiple times a day on projects. The team initiated new projects – some relevant and some that I knew was irrelevant – but the vital objective was to keep them gainfully productive – so I approved them.

Even with our portfolio founders, we initiated plans to refocus their attention on the most relevant job at hand, i.e., survive! We worked with them to cut growth spending, shrink expenses, prepare new budgets, and focus no-cost growth opportunities. The efforts started to pay off results slowly at first but much quicker as the plans took hold.

Many founders discovered opportunities that were otherwise looked over, and a number of them started new business lines. The founders loved the proactive approach. However, there were a couple of founders that got shocked into inaction, i.e., they did not want to alter their course even if it meant taking their titanic into the glacier at full speed.

Thankfully our early warnings gave them crucial extra minutes to avoid hitting their iceberg at 22 knots, and they were saved from sinking to the bottom. It was a much-required reminder for all of us on the value of proper prior planning.

Needless to say, the first two weeks of working from home was akin to the chaos that precedes a war. I was up at 5 am (on most of the days) and slept at no earlier than midnight. But my mind was switched on 24/7, as keeping the spirits up for everyone around me became a full-time obsession.

I operated from a makeshift home office (that was previously a storeroom), it had a single window and an air conditioner that threw out hot air for the first week.  I itched to get out of the house, to the airport and fly to an unknown destination. I needed a break, but it wasn’t coming – at least any time soon.

In those initial weeks, I compared my situation to Bruce Wayne’s in The Dark Knight Rises. Bruce is thrown to the bottom of the pit with little energy to climb to the top. But Bruce finds the inner strength to conquer the well, and Bane (eventually). Comparing it to my situation, getting my team and portfolio founders moving was akin to climbing up the pit. However, ensuring that my founders and my team thrive in the face of an inevitable washout would be like conquering Bane.

Part one is done, and I am 100% confident that we are on course to overcoming our Bane.

I’ll get back to you on that.

My Favorite Funding News of Last Week (W16)

After a lull in funding to gauge the impact of the Covid19 pandemic, the fundraising activity is starting to pick up. Most of the rounds are investors topping up their investments into their investee companies to ensure survival through this period. However, a marked drop in valuations has also encouraged investors to return with the cheque books.

My team and I shortlisted the deals for week 16 from Traxcn, Inc42, and YourStory, and we jointly picked out the following as the best funding picks for the last week:

Name: AknaMed

Amount Raised: $7 million from LGT Lightstone Aspada

What does AknaMed do?

Edited from Traxcn: Technology-enabled supply chain platform, which increases transparency and optimizes costs for both hospitals and manufacturers.

Why do I like AknaMed?

I expect a significant shift in supply chain logistics in the post-COVID19 world with platforms like Zilingo, Coutloot, and Aknamed acting as the tech bridge to reduce cost and increase transparency for retailers or service providers. A significant impediment for the B2B supply chain space would be providing credit for the last mile. Whether Aknamed intends to solve that inhouse or through a financial institution tie-up will be interesting to track.

 

Name: Joynt

Amount Raised: Undisclosed from SOSV’s MOX accelerator

What does Joynt do?

Edited from Traxcn: Joynt is a social selling platform. It provides a platform that allows users to create content and connect with the audience and make money through sell subscriptions, digital products & more. It also provides an Android app.

Why do I like Joynt?

Joynt is the excellent cross between an artist discovery, artist booking platform with additional features like booking video lessons & video calls with your favorite performers. They rely on short videos instead of text to help buyers to discover artists, which is a step above the text-heavy platforms today.

 

Name: Plop

Amount Raised: Undisclosed from Better Capital, EaSyndicate, Rohit Chanana, and others

What does Plop do?

Edited from Traxcn: Plop now is a platform for fiction stories. It provides stories under various categories, including horror, romance, mystery, drama, and steamy. The stories are told in the form of messages or text, and Plop monetizes its platform through subscription.

Why do I like Plop?

Content platforms are making hay in the COVID19 lockdown, which explains the 400% rise in Plop’s traffic. However, I choose Plop over other content platforms for their unique delivery style over reading a book. I will keenly follow whether Plop can maintain this engagement in the post-COVID19 period.

 

21 Point Action Plan to Corona-Proof Your Startup Dream

Calling the shutdown caused by the Coronavirus pandemic, an economic crisis is a gross understatement. It could be a crisis for the established business ecosystem, but it is the equivalent of a tsar bomba for the early-stage startup ecosystem. If all of us do not act quickly, the entire venture capital ecosystem is staring down at years of effort, getting incinerated in a matter of weeks.

When the Prime Minister, Mr. Narendra Modi, announced the Janta curfew, he talked about blackout drills and wartime curfews to a population where the majority hadn’t witnessed one. It was a reminder of a dark 15-20 period when India went through several wars with Pakistan & China. That ignited a mortal fear in me as well.

I feared that this crisis could destroy the decades of work that it took to provide confidence to young graduates to convert themselves from job seekers to job creators. We had to show years of results to convince Indian & global investors to pour money into startups via venture capital funds, angel networks, superangel syndicates, and venture debt funds. All this effort all this sacrifice, of the tens of thousands of people that make up the entrepreneurial ecosystem viz. over 39,000+ founders, 10,000+ angel investors, 500+ VC funds, several visionary politicians & government officers is on the brink of collapse.

However, real entrepreneurs are problem solvers, optimists, and overachievers. Any challenge, even something that challenges their mortal existence, will help an entrepreneur find another gear within them. As they say, even in adversity, they only see opportunity.

My team and I started to sound out Artha Venture Fund’s founders on the business impact the coronavirus pandemic was about to make a couple of weeks before lockdown. We asked our founders to create new budgets to account for the onset of nuclear winter in the fundraising world, bring their expenses down to the bare minimum, and to show patience along with courage at this time.

It has not been easy to convince the optimist in them to slow down for now and conserve energy to speed up later. Last week we put all our heads together on a zoom call to chart out an action plan for saving their dream – their startup.

I summarized the call in a 21-point action plan to save your startup memo for the founders. My team went a step further to make it into a beautiful & impactful presentation. In the spirit of joining hands during this adversity, I am sharing that presentation with you:

 

It is important to remember the immortal words of General S Patton:

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Together we will win the coronavirus fight in our homes, in our businesses, and our minds. Let’s roll!
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