How To Get a Job With a Contrarian Investor

I haven’t blogged consistently as much as I would have liked to in the past few weeks. However, as I started writing the answer to a question asked on www.showmedamani.com/ama, it went from a short form answer to a full-blown blog. It was the best trigger to restart my daily blogging habit.

The question asked: How can I learn more about investing? How can I get a job with a marquee investor?

The first question to answer is, who is a marquee investor?

A marquee investor is someone that consistently beats the market over a long period. Anyone that has invested for a living will tell you that beating the market is not easy; therefore, the select few that do, do it by refusing to follow the market. These investors few enter (or exit) investments against market sentiments because they figure out that the market has mispriced a stock, sector, instrument, etc.

Investors that invest against the market sentiments get branded as contrarian investors.  I consider myself to be one too.

I  understand why finance or investment professionals want to learn from contrarian investors, and it isn’t about the money.

Contrarian investors represent something far more significant, the ability to speak up (through their investment decisions) against the majority and – win. At its very core, contrarian investing is the classic underdog favorite story of David vs. Goliath.

It isn’t a surprise many contrarian investors get bombarded with requests for “ability to learn” from them. What is surprising (to me) is how individuals that want to emulate contrarians do it by approaching them conventionally. They send resumes with cover letters praising the portfolio picks, but their resumes and praises get lost in a pile of many deserving candidates.

So how can a candidate stand out?

The biggest challenge for contrarians is to find people that want to challenge the status quo. It takes a lot of guts to develop a contrarian thesis and an even stronger constitution to hold onto that belief. Contrarian strategies look incorrect for a long time before they look correct, and a contrarian can lose employees, friends, family, and investors by holding onto that belief.

Michael Burry’s predicament in The Big Short is an excellent example of how lonely (and frustrating) it can be as a contrarian holding onto their predictions.

Therefore If a candidate wants to showcase that they can think, act, and hold onto contrarian views, it shouldn’t it reflect in their attempt to seek a job?

Here is an exciting approach that I thought of (and could work on me, possibly):

  • Study your target investor’s thesis and learn how they pick their investments.
  • Try to find the next investment that would excite your target.
  • Prepare an in-depth investment recommendation note for your target.
  • Your note should highlight your ability to research, analyze, model, and recommend.
  • But it should showcase your nonconformist approach to investing, the ability to find information where no one is looking.
  • Most importantly, it should put it on display that you do not think about where the ball is right now, you think about where the ball is going to be.
  • Send that note to your target with a detailed cover letter explaining why you chose the investment you did and how you went about your process.
  • If you have gone a step ahead to tie up the investment for them too – major brownie points.
  • Most importantly: do not ask your target for a job or an opportunity to work with them. Just ask them for feedback on your investment note.

This approach requires effort. However, if one wants to run ahead of the crowd, like Usain Bolt, they must practice harder than everyone else too.

6 Learnings after 60 days of WFH – for Founders

Yesterday was the 60th day since we shut down our office, but it feels much longer. Partly because of the roller coaster journey I have had with a concept that I could not understand, i.e., working from home. In the last 60 days, I have gone from hating to loving the work from home concept and from working myself to the bone to appreciating the freedom and higher productivity this concept brings to my team and to me.   

There are several posts on how to manage employees that are working from home, but very few focus their attention on the founder that is leading their startup through troubled waters. I had 6 distinct learnings that reshaped the way I thought about working from home: 

 

 

  1. Hyper-productivity has its limitations 

    I was guilty of indulging in this mistake for the first 30 days. Theoretically, I saved 90 minutes of commute time; therefore, I decided that I could take on more tasks and responsibilities. Thus, in addition to my duties as a fund manager, I was reworking budgets with our portfolio companiestook on the chief editor role for Artha’s blogs, and I was conducting multiple team calls a day to keep the team focussed and engaged. 

    It was exciting and new the first couple of weeks, and I enjoyed working myself to the point of exhaustion because it kept all the negativity around the crisis out of my mind. However, hyper-productivity began providing diminishing returns the more I indulged in it. 

    It started with general irritability and slight distractions, but eventually, the focus on work suffered, and the list of tasks pending on me started to pile up. Finally, there was just a general numbness to all the work. The enjoyment of completing one task was quickly replaced by the groan of watching the tasks list continuing to expand

    became aware of the toll my hyper-productive avatar was having on my physical and mental health. Eventually, it started affecting my interpersonal relationships – at work and at home. With some sage advice, I toned down my hyperproductivity ambitions and focussed on quality instead of quantity. I concentrated on completing 5 tasks per day (nothing more or less) and utilizing the extra time to expand my knowledge horizon.

  2. Recognizing and dealing with Zoom fatigue 

    It was fun to be on an endless stream of Zoom calls. The meetings were shorter, I drank fewer calories, and I could do double the number of meetings. Then as Brad Feld put it, I started to experience Zoom Fatigue. I caught myself replying to emails, responding to internal team chats, or editing investor newsletters during these online meetings. I was there, but I was not present

    It did not help that I made my meeting schedule so tightly packed that there was no room for error; therefore, if there was an unscheduled call, it would be a couple of days before I could get back to them. 

    At the start of this month, I reduced the time I allocated for online meetings. Encouraged with the results, I have limited my online meeting schedule to just 3 hours a day from this week. This workaround will give me ample down-time to catch up with my inbox, tasks, and team chat – allowing me to be fully attentive during the online meetings 

  3. Taking a break 

    It is ironic that I would find it challenging to take a break from working while working at home. The opportunity to take a break (my TV) is less than 10 steps away, the bed just another 15 steps. Despite my intense working schedule over my 15year working career, I continued to watch at least 1 new movie a week on averageHowever, in the last 9 weeks, I have watched a grand total of 2 new filmsand I had to split watching each one over 2-3 weeks. 

    The fact that the opportunity to take a break was so close developed a false sense of comfort that I could take a break at any time. That time did not come because there was always something pressing that needed my attention.  

    Although it was late, the benefits of taking breaks finally dawned on me. A couple of weeks back, I took a 3-day weekend (I still ended up working for half a day), caught up with friends, and on my sleep. I had a fresh perspective on projects & a spring in my voice when I resumed work, convincing me that taking a break is an imperative undertaking for any founder.

  4. Setting boundaries 

    When we are done with work, we shut our laptops, stuff them into our bags, we commute back home, switching off all the work-related tabs in our minds and refreshing the tabs for our personal livesWhat happens when that commute is cut down to 90 seconds? 

    In my first month I was taking work calls from 8 am to 10 pm daily, I slept with work and woke up in it. There are several times in a year when VCmust put in those types of hours, especially when we are closing multiple deals. However, this was different.

    I did not have time to work out, I took tons of notes with a mental promise to review them but could not find the time to do it. Many a time, I could not remember what I ate for dinner and in what quantity! These endless hours started to take a toll on the team as well.

    I instituted a pm deadline on myself for all workrelated meetings. Everything that could not get completed by 7 pm would get pushed to the next day. To commit myself to this deadline, I started working out on cure.fit with a partner who would ensure that I did not miss workouts, therefore, ensuring that my work-day had an ending

    Without boundaries, the boon of working from home can quickly turn into a curse. Therefore, it is a good idea to schedule winding up and winding down activities so that there is a psychological boundary between work & home. 

  5. Schedule tasks into your calendar 

    There is a big difference between being busy and being productive. One can be busy all day but have nothing to show for their busyness at nightOn the other hand, productivity demands results, it demands focus.  

    I learned an excellent productivity hack that has worked wonders for me. Instead of having a to-do list or a task list – I get my tasks directly scheduled into my calendar, thereby blocking out time to focusThe scheduled slots are limited to 30-45 minutes chunks, with a 15-mins break at the end for contingencies and to report to the team after the job assigned to me is completed. There is an excellent post on Effective Scheduling for more on this. 

  6. Take a vacation 

    It sounds ironic that I would propose vacation time amid an economic crisis, especially when we are working from home! However, a lot of founders have forgone summer vacations due to the way this crisis creeping upon us. As a founder, we must recognize that vacations are essential with several scientifically known benefits of what breaking routines do for our minds & bodies

    While there are minimal options for us to travel for a vacation, there are other ways to take a break from the world and give the body & mind time to recharge their batteries. The Washington Post provided an excellent resource for vacationing at home, aptly titled, The completely correct guide to vacationing at home.

    Oh! You will find the perfect vacation auto-response in my 18-month-old postPerfecting the vacation auto-response.

Summarizing my exit interview with a venture capital intern 

Two interns finished their learning cycle with Artha this week. One of them wanted to speak to me and get my feedback on his performance during his 4month internshipThe schedule short feedback session went on much longer, and at the end of it, we got into an exciting topic – the importance of forming an opinion.  

I believe our discussion applies to anyone who wants to work in the investment business, especially earlystage venture capital. I am sharing a synopsis of that conversation with the permission of the intern.  

 

Intern: What is one piece of advice for me? 

Me: Form an opinion and be vocal about it. It is acceptable to be wrong, completely wrong, and heinously wrong. However, it is cardinal mistake to have the ability to accumulate and analyze data but lack the courage to form a decisive opinion. The best investors have often sought out views from their peers and from people who could provide them with a fresh perspective. In fact, the investors I emulate often seek out contrarian views to their own to test their hypothesis.  

 

Intern: Why is the trait of forming and communicating our opinions so important? 

believe that investing is the ability to predict future outcomes of current decisions, and an investor’s brilliant foresight finds appreciation only in hindsight. That is why I consider investing more of an art than scienceA room full of experienced appreciators of art would almost inevitably have deep-felt disagreements on the value of Van Gogh. They could all be right or be wrong – we would only find out once the money gets transferred into the sellers account 

 

What should an intern do?  

fondly remember eyeopening realizations I have had during discussions (sometimes heated) with interns, associates, principalspartners, coinvestors, and even entrepreneurs over the last 10 years in venture capital. Initially, it was intimidating for me to showcase my opinions in front of the experienced hands of this game. But I realized that I wasnt learning anything by keeping them to myself. I learned more by expressing my incorrect opinions and recognizing the gaps in my understanding, over keeping my opinion to myself for fear of getting called out.  

A newcomer to the investment industry should seek out experiences where they can form these opinions. Join investment clubs, seek out investors who have strong opinions, even if they are contrarians to their own, but learn how to build and present your investment viewpoint. 

 

Don’t be afraid of being wrong; we learn best through the mistakes we make. Expressing your opinion is a win-win situation. You either get called out and learn where you went wrong, or your opinion contributes valuably to the discussion. Most importantly, you grow with each interaction and learn to receive constructive criticism. 

Be The Best Of Whatever You Are

It is increasingly clear that India will get back to work in the next 2-4 weeks. However, it won’t be business as usual. Some will get back to work earlier than others. Many of us will be out looking for jobs as the companies we worked for will try to rebuild themselves without us. The road to recovery will be long and hard, but each of us will have an important role to play as we help rebuild the economy.

The biggest lesson we’ve learned from this lockdown is that we are more resilient and self-sufficient than we give ourselves credit for. Another big lesson we’ve all learned is that when we are faced with impossible odds, the best response is to act – don’t stop to dwell on spilled milk.

There is a beautiful Douglas Malloch poem that I read in How to Stop Worrying and Start Living written by Dale Carnegie that captures the essence of that I would like to convey to those that are getting ready to get back to work or to look for a job:

 

If you can’t be a pine on the top of the hill,

Be a scrub in the valley — but be

The best little scrub by the side of the rill;

Be a bush if you can’t be a tree.

 

If you can’t be a bush be a bit of the grass,

And some highway happier make;

If you can’t be a muskie then just be a bass —

But the liveliest bass in the lake!

 

We can’t all be captains, we’ve got to be crew,

There’s something for all of us here,

There’s big work to do, and there’s lesser to do,

And the task you must do is the near.

 

If you can’t be a highway then just be a trail,

If you can’t be the sun be a star;

It isn’t by size that you win or you fail —

Be the best of whatever you are!

My funding picks from last week (w05)

There were 15 deals in week 5 of 2020 that were available on Traxcn, Inc42, and YourStory,
I sat with our funding team, and after some enlighting discussions, I have shortlisted my picks to:

Name: InterviewBit
Amount Raised: $20 million
Investors: Tiger Global Management & Sequoia India
What does InterviewBit do?
Edited from Traxcn: InterviewBit is an online platform for tech interview preparation. The platform offers gamified lessons with video tutorials, primer problems, and guided solutions for programming, scripting, databases, system design, puzzles, etc. The platform also enables the candidates to get connected with the right companies worldwide based on skills and preferences.
Why do I like InterviewBit?
I like focussed vocational plays. Last year I had picked out GreyAtom as a funding pick as it provided an upskilling platform for data science and web development employees. Therefore picking it isn’t a surprise that InterviewBit got selected even though the $20 million round from Tiger & Sequoia is bigger than a typical Series A round in India.
InterviewBit solves an exciting problem of finding, interviewing, and evaluating tech talent, which is the Achilles heel of the best of Indian start-ups. The CAC for such plays is quite high, but considering the 18-35 lakh rupee salary bracket they target, the rewards may outweigh the costs.
Only request – can someone create a platform for finance and accounting employees! 😊

Name: AdonMo
Amount Raised: Rs. 21.4 crores
Investors: Bace Capital, Astarc & Mumbai Angels
What does AdonMo do?
Edited from Traxcn: Adonmo provides an in-transit cab advertising platform for advertisers to reach their target audience. It enables advertisers to place their ads on top of the cab and select the target location and relevant time slots to display advertisements and track their ads in real-time. It uses a proprietary computer vision and hyper-local technology to identify its viewers and advertise.
Why do I like AdonMo?
It was unbelievable that I had created a business plan to provide contextual ads based on geo-location on top of taxis during a 6-7 months stint in Kolkata in 2012 or 2013. I had reached out to taxi-top display manufacturers in China who could provide the hardware required for this service. These plays were very popular for advertisers in Africa as most homes did not have electricity – therefore, taxi-top displays were the primary distributors of advertising. But AdonMo is precisely doing what I could not i.e., EXECUTE on the idea.
I am excited about AdonMo as it disrupts the hold billboard owners have enjoyed for several decades. A moving billboard provides better and deeper reach to advertisers with exhaustive reporting and must work out to be of much better value than a billboard.

Name: YoloBus
Amount Raised: Rs. 4.28 crore
Investors: Undisclosed
What does YoloBus do?
Edited from Traxcn: Yolobus provides an online-based platform for booking intercity tickets. Users can book tickets by giving details like location, date, time, etc. It offers features like real-time tracking, in-cabin Wi-Fi, Toilet, Pantry, CCTV cameras, etc.
Why do I like YoloBus?
There are several intercity bus services. So what is interesting about just another intercity bus service?
There are several intercity bus ticket booking platforms – So what is interesting about just another intercity bus ticket booking platform?
India is home to the world’s largest and fastest-growing middle-class population. India’s growth pulled 271 million people out of poverty between 2006 and 2016. It is only a matter of time before India’s per capita income will cross $4000 with and a majority of the Indians will belong to the middle to upper-middle class i.e., aspirational class.
This vast majority of people will have a very different consumption basket and preferences compared to the sustenance living Indian, and services like YoloBus cater to a growing section of the Indian audience.
While Yolo may get considered a bit ahead of its time, if it can keep its costs of operation and customer acquisition in control and sustain – there is a big market for it to capture!
One question, though – why are the investors undisclosed? The first time for me to see a release in which the amount gets disclosed but not the investors!  

My PR Experiment

Yesterday was an interesting day. I started off by tasting different blends of single shot coffee made by a start-up that we have been eyeing for a while now. They have been some gaining significant traction and the tasting culminated in the issuance of a term-sheet. In my next appointment, I visited several branches of a food aggregator that provides home cooked meals in an IoT enabled device. The heavy dose of caffeine from the morning helped me stay awake after an extraordinarily heavy lunch, but I really liked what the company was doing, and so we issued them a term-sheet too. In the last meeting of the day, I was with two entrepreneurs who are looking to fill the niche left open by Bira in the beer industry, and so I ended up tasting their different beers. Their product, taste, packaging and brand positioning are all unique and I’ll be honest, we are contemplating issuing them a term-sheet too. But no, this blog isn’t about tasting and issuing term-sheets, it’s about the commonality I observed in all three funding outlays, which I asked the founders to rectify i.e. instead of outsourcing it to an external agency, build an in-house marketing team to manage social media channels, PR and internal-external communication.

I used to erroneously advocate outsourcing PR and media management, but that viewpoint was permanently altered. I conducted a yearlong experiment in which I discontinued the services of our external PR agency and brought those functions in-house. Not only did I gain more control on what Artha (and I) wanted to communicate, but we also got more media mentions, got covered by the top journalists and were invited to renowned events around the globe. We also started publishing separate monthly and quarterly newsletters for our LPs and well-wishers.  All this effort has paid off through a marked increase in business for all the Artha entities, but most importantly, we achieved all these objective at 60% off our previous costs.

All of our PR (yes, all of it) was organic and genuine i.e. unpaid for. We did not sponsor events, pay for advertising in publications or authored articles. Things are moving so well that this year we are expanding the internal team by bringing in a Social Media Head that can move us from prose to video. Since we understand that the entire process isn’t a one-man job, we are allocating him/her a budget to recruit a team to facilitate this transition.

This massive cost saving got me questioning the PR/Media management agency model and whether it really works for an early-stage startup. I am afraid it does not. It takes many months and a lot of effort to get a brand new startup relevant and unpaid media attention. Unfortunately, early stage start-ups do not have the budget to compensate top-level agencies for their effort or even tier 2 or tier 3 players (unless they can secure a strong referral). Therefore, start-ups end up working with PR firms that themselves are starting up.  These PR firms overload their staff with multiple projects, to make ends meet, distributing the employee cost over the projects to make operations profitable. However, that divided cost also means divided time and focus on each project – a situation that does not bode well for start-ups trying to make a dollar for every penny invested in marketing. In fact, I have seen PR agents pitch 4-5 ideas to the same journalist in a single bid hoping to get any of them published. Is that really how you want your start-up to be pitched?

Another issue that works against the interest of the start-up is when a PR agency works hard to meet the KPIs they have promised and manages to do so in the first 15 days of the month. Having met their KPIs, they go radio silent for the rest of the month. This essentially means that their promised KPIs are the limit and not the base on which the agency works – completely opposite to how founders set KPIs for their internal team. After all, you can only create value for your company when you get more value than you pay for, isn’t it?

Therefore, I have come to a conclusion that PR agencies are useful for short sprints or Big Bang announcements, but the marathon work of building an image and brand for your startup should be done by an in-house team. In fact, even the 22 Immutable Laws of Marketing recommends the same!

37/2019

Your 'Growth' is Hurting Your Job Interviews

Currently, I am in the middle of interviews to fill several positions at Artha and one of the first questions I ask candidates is why they are changing jobs? The common answer I receive is that they are looking for growth.  Most of these people have been at their current jobs for less than 24 months, so it makes me wonder whether the growth they seek is truly in terms of experience or in the size of their pay-check. Usually, it is the latter and their feeble attempt at answering this truly important question hurts their prospects with us as it does with most employers. Allow me to explain.

I have been a part of the workforce since I was 16 years old and the first job I got paid for was in my first year of college at the age of 18. In the next 4 years of college, I went through 4 jobs and ran 2 businesses from my room. One of those jobs was selling retail jewellery which I did throughout my 4 years. In that, I found my calling i.e. sales. My next job was door to door sales, a position I held for 5 years before becoming an entrepreneur within the same organisation. When I came back to India, I went through 3-4 jobs in a (relatively) short span of time before deciding to dive full-time into setting up Artha.

Having cycled through almost 10 jobs I am in no way advocating that a person should not change jobs or look for better salary packages. In a free marketing and capitalist economy this is exactly the type of behaviour that is expected and encouraged. However, I could, as I expect anyone should be able to decide whether they love a company/opportunity/job within the first 6-12 months. Therefore, if I was investing any time beyond that in the company, it meant that I was certain I would make a future for myself there.

It’s not that I didn’t feel like quitting my jobs several, several times. For example, there were times when I felt that I was going to be stuck in my position for ever or that I was getting looked over for promotions or that I was getting jaded, but I stuck it through those times. Then seemingly out of nowhere a new opportunity, office or position would open up and due to the fact that I was there at the right time, as the right person, just like that the juggernaut was rolling again.

So I feel that if temporary situations would have affected my decision to stay with the company, then that should have happened in the first 6-12 months, because in my opinion, that is usually the timeframe when a person should have decided whether they like the job role, the boss and can live with the hygiene factors at their workplace. However, if it takes over 24 months for someone to decide whether their current job will excite them or not, that doesn’t build my confidence in your assessment abilities or more likely questions them.

There could be several situations that could have forced you to change your job (location change, family obligation, bankruptcy) and these might give you a good story to tell that is both convincing and genuine. However, if you are changing jobs for “growth” related issues but it took you more than 24 months to realise it, then you need to have a bloody good story for me to believe you (and my standards are high).

30/2019

Join Artha as an Entrepreneur in Residence

Vinod and I have been playing around the idea of setting up our own version of EIRs (Entrepreneurs-in-Residence) at AVF (Artha Venture Fund). Vinod proposed this idea during our Monday morning pow-wow as a possible solution to the difficulty we have faced in finding an entrepreneurial teams that work in areas where we identify a significant market opportunity or wish/want to deploy funds.  

So, I read about EIR programs and best practices today, and as Vinod has had previous experience with these programs, I believe we could build a similar program at Artha which will be beneficial to both, the entrepreneur and us.  

EIR programs have existed for a while in the developed VC eco-systems,  several CVCs and US universities have successfully utilised the EIR position for their requirements.  

For Artha Venture Fund’s requirements, I found a few articles that provide a good context on what I’m looking for.  

I am convinced that we should try hiring an EIR for a 6 to 12-month period and test out whether this would work for AVF.

The objective for the EIR would be to work on creating a business plan while simultaneously working with the fund team on evaluating start-ups for investments and helping the investee companies. Therefore, the program can only be for people that have been a part of a founding team (or core team) of a funded start-up, big or small.  

While many of the details are yet to be worked out (and I will share them in future posts), here are some that come to mind- 

  • Contract period: 6 months with a mutual option to extend for 6 months 
  • Salary package: 8.00 L / annum (includes a 5% communication allowance) 
  • Work timing:
    1. 9 am to 7 pm
    2. Monday- Saturday
  • Perks: laptop, cell-phone, company paid phone service and a desk 
  • Minimum requirement:
    1. Attending all evaluation sessions 
    2. Helping portfolio companies  
    3. Writing their own business plan  

While most the EIR programs have left the choice of where to focus his/her entrepreneurial energies to the EIR, my fund (as Vinod will rightly remind me) does not have the luxury of millions of dollars coming to its coffers in management fees therefore each penny has to be accounted for to operate a sustainable VC business.  

Therefore, I want to make it clear that we are looking to pick EIRs that have a tech orientation and would like to work in B2B, B2C or B2B2C start-ups (but nothing in deep tech for now).  

Some of the plays that have my team and I interested are:  

If would like to apply for the EIR position, please fill out this form and attach your resume.

102/2018

I am looking for a Recruitment Specialist

With a growing portfolio and 5 internal companies, someone or the other is always looking for new hires. So far we have been managing this position ourselves, in an ad-hoc manner or handing it over to the existing HR manager. The list of people we need to hire is getting unmanageable and I need professional help.
As the recruitment specialist, you will be responsible for the end to end recruitment lifecycle of all the companies under The Artha Group as well as the Startups that we work with. You will work closely with different department heads and their teams to give advice on the best practices and provide the support they need for all recruitment-related concerns.
Your contribution will have to align with Employers:

1. Branding guidelines
2. Their respective social media strategies
3. Technology requirements

What you will do:

• Develop and maintain strong working relationships with departmental heads and founders to create successful and credible partnerships, that satisfy their requirements
• Drive the end-to-end recruitment process and ensure both speed and quality of hires
• Leverage all recruitment channels, including internal career sites, college events, traditional and alternative sources to identify and recruit the very best candidates
• Use face-to-face behavioral-based interviewing methodologies to interview internal and external candidates
• Actively improve recruitment processes
• Manage stakeholders in an effective way, work towards the highest level of stakeholder satisfaction
• Coaching departmental heads in interviewing techniques and tactics
• Take responsibility for own project initiatives

This position is for you if you have:

• 2 years of end-to-end recruitment experience, preferably in a multinational or shared service environment
• Fluent in English (both written and verbal)
• Excellent communication and stakeholder management skills
• Knowledge about the Hungarian SSC market from a recruitment point of view is essential
• Flexibility and ability to work in a rapidly changing environment
• Familiarity with assessment techniques and closing recruitment processes
• The passion to continuously evolve yourself and your processes
• Creativity to identify new recruitment processes
• Bachelors or Masters Degree (preferably in Human Resources)
• Experience in recruiting for a niche and/or highly technical area is a distinct advantage

Why should you join us:

• Internal coaching/mentoring culture
• Unravel your continuous process improvement mindset – new ideas are always heard
• Support of career aspirations and personal development
• We provide a laptop and mobile phone

To apply, send in a one-page resume and cover letter to careers@artha.group.
 
81/2018

Why We Must Become that Asshole Investor (from time to time)

2018 started off with a bang for Artha India Ventures. 4 of our portfolio companies successfully raised new rounds with pre-money valuations of more than $5 million. As a team, we are very happy with the solid multiples that we received on our investments and it validates our thesis of getting in early, building solid value and increasing wealth for all shareholders. These are the times when we look forward to celebrating with our founders for a job well done and to wish them luck on the new journey that has just begun (with the incoming investor).
However, there are a couple of founders that bring forth disturbing issues at the time of signing documents that hold up the entire round of investment. Usually, I can classify the issues that force this reaction into two buckets. The first and most contentious issue is the diktat issued by the incoming investor to disallow any of the previous investors from participating in the new round.
As an investor who invests in multiple stages, we have specific clauses in our investment documentation that allow us to participate in future fundraising rounds of a company. Whatever the logic the new investor can provide (more on this in a later post) we as the early backers of the venture expect the founders to stand up for us and remain loyal to their word and contract, that were negotiated and signed when we initially decided to back them. While many founders ensure that we get to participate in the new round (thank you to them), we do not have sympathy for those who behave this way even without being coerced by another investor.
At the time when these founders needed the money, they eagerly signed the documents with these terms clearly being stated, but when it comes to actually following through for a follow-on round they want to cry foul. To completely sell yourself to the incoming investors and screw over your earliest backers doesn’t bode well for our ecosystem. Firstly, the new investors will only put in stronger clauses to ensure the same doesn’t happen to them in the following round and secondly, the later investors will be way more cautious and hesitant when considering the opportunity to participate because of your past behavior towards investors.
Unfortunately for them, Artha does not respond well to oppression tactics and while we can understand the occasional tough spot a founder finds himself/herself in, the founder cannot always cry wolf.
To be involved in a bitter conflict at a time when we should be celebrating victory is a situation I want to avoid at all costs, but founders need to understand and respect that just like them we too are running a business and to deny us the rights that we mutually agreed before entering the relationship, tinkers with our business model. Just like they would not like to tinker with a business model that is doing well – neither do we!!
21/2018