Flashback Friday: BrandIdea Consultancy

BrandIdea is a business intelligence tool for marketing and sales information. They offer a SaaS-based business intelligence enterprise tool that helps companies analyze their markets & last-mile sales data. It Integrates and models data from a multitude of sources and client’s internal data to provide analytics to gain insights & maximize the ROI of marketing campaigns.

 

Using advanced Data Science techniques, they generate visually enriched granular analytics streams that are dynamic, deep, and point to precise directions that help companies to make the right decisions. Critically, these analytics are granular – at the micro-market level, thus creating a bottom-up, aggregating impact of customized marketing actions. So not only can the companies re-visit their decisions at short intervals to course-correct or shift priorities periodically, they can do so at every geo-location, creating the bedrock for growth.

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Founder: Suresh Pillai Total funding raised INR 2.25 Crores
2020 status: Operational in Chennai Number of rounds 2
Co-investors: Mumbai Angels

 

Why did you invest in BrandIdea?

In a market as broad and diverse as (pre-digitalized) India, information at the last mile was always challenging to collect, and the data that existed was inaccurate. BrandIdea provided a solution using which large brands could gather granular and in-depth information about that last mile. This information not only helped the brands with their marketing efforts but also their inventory and other aspects of their business.

BrandIdea was the first enterprise tech company that I invested in. The decision was driven by the fact that their enterprise clients had massive marketing budgets and teams that would be willing to pay for that level of granular data.

 

What were the risks involved with an investment in BrandIdea?

As with any B2B SaaS play, there are a few issues we knew we would face.

  • One of them is the long decision-making timelines that large conglomerates like Colgate, Tide, HUL, Unilever, etc. have. However, it is worth being said that once the partnership is complete, these partnerships can be very lucrative.
  • Enterprises have long gestation periods to make a decision; therefore, another risk with Enterprise SaaS is the sales-cycles are going to be extended. You need to maintain firm control on the burn and accommodate for completing those decision cycles.
  • Another risk is that Enterprise SaaS companies can become profitable but not scalable. This could turn it into a lifestyle business, where the founder makes enough money to live comfortably but doesn’t grow, and as a VC investor, you’re stuck. B2B SaaS plays need to move quickly towards $1M per year in revenue before they can be considered a moderate success. The longer it takes to get there, the lesser the chances of it getting further VC interest.

 

What are your learnings from your investment in BrandIdea?

As I mentioned earlier, there are long gestation periods, and it’s a lot of relationship-building with enterprise SaaS companies. It takes a while to get a lot of clients, and the slower that process is, the worse it is for a VC investor.

This was also the first time we invested in a family-operated business, by Suresh and his daughter, and his daughter eventually left the company.

We learned how to evaluate such companies better. If a company gets into a lifestyle-business model, how do you, as an investor, get your money back; or get good enough dividends. We are still learning that.

 

Would you invest in a ‘BrandIdea’ if it came to you today?

When it comes to enterprise SaaS, we’ve learned that it’s a long process to build a company, and as traditional investors, our IRR expectations are upwards of 75% per year. While BrandIdea didn’t burn too much capital, they didn’t grow fast enough for our liking. Therefore, we don’t think that we are the right investors for them, and they aren’t the right investments for us.

 

What are the exit opportunities that can be foreseen for BrandIdea now?

The possible exit opportunities would either be a founder/company buyback, or the business gets rolled up into a large company offering a suite of products to similar enterprises.

 

Flashback Friday: Rolocule Games

Rolocule Games is a game development studio creating realistic, casual, and social video games for tablets and smartphones. They design games using emerging technologies such as AR, VR, IoT, and AI. From designing award-winning Rolomotion™ technology for Apple to the recent Eagle Eye, which was an SXSW 2019 Innovation Awards finalist, Rolocule is emerging as amongst the leaders in leveraging cutting-edge technology in game design and experiences.

 

Rolocule created the official Australian open Tennis VR game in association with Australian open and Infosys. Their impeccable business ethic about being nimble and flexible has got them rapidly developing multiple games and pivoting, as industry change has become a case study at the world’s top business schools, Harvard and IIM-B.

 

Founder: Rohit Gupta Total funding raised INR 6 Crores
2020 status: Operational in Pune Number of rounds 4
Co-investors: Blume Ventures, Mumbai Angels, CIIE

 

 

  1. Why did you invest in Rolocule Games?

Other than being intrigued by the gaming sector, Rolocule had a fantastic team. What swung my decision was when they were trying to create a game which would utilize your smartphone as a gaming paddle, similar to how the Wii Remote functions. Their game Super Badminton for the iPhone was a huge hit – big enough that they were invited to Cupertino by Apple in 2013.

 

  1. What were the risks involved with an investment in Rolocule Games?

Like with any gaming company, it’s a zero-one risk; it’s either a success or a failure. Rolocule was going to be a success and a fantastic winner in our portfolio, or they were going to shut down. Creating, publishing, and promoting a game is an expensive proposition, and funding would only give them a few chances to succeed. It was also possible that the games would not be received well, and if there were 2-3 failures in a row, it considerably reduces the chances of following games being a success.

 

  1. Where do you place your investment in Rolocule Games when you see the success of games like FIFA, PokémonGo, etc.?

In my opinion, the two aren’t comparable. Apart from the difference in budgets, games like the FIFA series are licensed brand names from the organizations and backed by AAA game studios like EA Sports. PokémonGo has Nintendo’s name behind it, and Pokémon is a sensation on its own. Just these reasons are enough to set them apart, overlooking the fact that games like FIFA are updated and released annually. Rolocule exists in a different gaming space where they’ve integrated the technology in smartphones to software, allowing players to use it as a racquet or a paddle, like the Wii Remote.

 

  1. What are your learnings from your investment in Rolocule Games?

It taught me to be more realistic about zero-one plays, where you need to know when it’s not working and stop pumping more money into it. Initial success is not a guarantor for long-term success. It also taught me that not everything could be gets written off as simply; Rolocule went from becoming a game developer and publisher to just a developer of games. I’ve also learned that the defensibility of games is lower than usual. Similar to how most movies have a shelf life of 4-6 months, you have to reap everything you can in that window of opportunity.

 

  1. Would you invest in a similar startup today?

Yes, but with some caveats. As an investor, I would want better control. With the experience of backing a zero-one style business, I have a much better understanding of the space, and I would invest in an entrepreneur like Rohit again. Still, in terms of the venture, I would be more careful about the valuation and evaluate success, keeping in mind that initial success is not a guarantor of long-term viability.

 

 

Book Review: Ikigai

In my recent memory, Japan has always held the crown for the longest living humans –  almost 20 years higher than the world average. Therefore, it isn’t a surprise that Japan also has the highest centenarians per capita, i.e., the highest ratio of people that are over 100 years old as a percentage of its population.  

Within Japan, the island of Okinawa (aka The Land of Immortals) has the highest rate of centenarians per capita. Okinawa also holds the global immortality title as it has the highest occurrence of centenarians in the world 

The nutritionally dense but low calorieOkinawa diet is credited to be significant factor behind this phenomenon. However, the legend of Okinawans is more than what they eat, which is what Ikigai: the Japanese secret to a long and happy life delves deeply into.  

The word ikigai translates to “the happiness of always being busy, and it is the reason we get up in the morning. What is ikigai, and how do the Okinawans follow it is the concept that reverberates throughout the book.  

Here are my favorite highlights from the book 

  • Okinawans live by the principle of ichariba chode, a local expression that means “treat everyone like a brother, even if you’ve never met them before.  
  • Eat only until your stomach is 80% full  
  • Most health problems are caused by stress 
  • The mind has tremendous power over the body and how quickly it ages 
  • If you keep moving with your fingers working, 100 years will come to you  
  • The last of human freedoms – to choose one’s attitude in any given set of circumstances, to choose one’s own way 
  • We don’t create the meaning of our life – we discover it  
  • We all have the capacity to do noble or terrible things. The side of the equation we end up on depends on our decisions, not on the condition in which we find ourselves.  
  • Accept your feelings. 
  • If we try to get rid of one wave with another, we end up with an infinite sea   
  • We shouldn’t focus on eliminating symptoms, because recovery will come on its own 
  • We can’t control our emotions, but we can take charge of our actions every day 
  • It is much more important to have a compass pointing to a concrete objective than to have a map 
  • Technology is great if were in control of itIt’s not so great if it takes control of us. 
  • The most important thing is to be disciplined in completing the cycle.  
  • If you are not truly being challenged, we get bored and add a layer of complexity to amuse yourself  
  • The most important thing is to focus on the journey 
  • Humor can break negative cycles and reduce anxiety  
  • A happy man is too satisfied with the present to dwell on the future  
  • The secret is smiling and having a good time  
  • Spending time together and having fun is the only thing that matters  
  • To live a long time you need to do three things: exercise to stay healthy, eat well and spend time with people  
  • Talking each day with the people you love, that’s the secret to a long life 
  • They celebrate all the time, even little things, Music, song, and dance are essential parts of daily life  
  • They ate an average of eighteen different food each day 
  • More than 30 percent of their daily calories come from vegetables  
  • Serving food on many small plates makes it easier to avoid eating too much 
  • An active body leads to a calm mind  
  • They concentrate on the things that they can control and don’t worry about those they cant 
  • To practice negative visualization we have to reflect on negative events but without worrying about them 
  • Worrying about things that are beyond our control accomplishes nothing.  
  • It is not what happens to you but how you react that matters  
  • Only things that are imperfect, incomplete, and ephemeral can truly be beautiful because those things resemble the natural world  
  • This moment exists only now and won’t come again  
  • To build resilience into our lives, we shouldn’t fear adversity  
  • Setback is an opportunity for growth  
  • Each moment will hold so many possibilities that it will seem like almost an eternity  
  • Life is not a problem to be solved  
  • Just remember to have something that keeps you busy doing what you love while being surrounded by the people who love you. 
  • Today is all you have. Make the most of it.  

My Funding Picks For The Last Week (W21)

Every Monday, I sit with my team to review the funding activity of the previous week. From that list, I pick out 3 companies that I would have loved to invest in or find founders that are doing similar things. Click here to know about my rationale behind this weekly exercise.

 

Another 2 weeks of lockdown (probably more for metro cities) should not dampen the investment spirits. Deal activity continues to temper, but it hasn’t completely stopped. Last week saw 13 startups raise $88 million – 8 of which were in the early-stage space.

After sifting through the news (aggregated from Tracxn, Inc42, and YourStory), I picked out these three as my favorite funding news from last week!

 

Name: Refrens

Amount Raised: Undisclosed from Vijay Shekhar Sharma, Anupam Mittal, others

What does Refrens do?

Edited from Traxcn: Refrens is accounting software for freelancers. The features of the product are expanding customer base by referrals, budget planning, creating GST invoices, reminders, and more. The product is free for freelancers such as software developers, logo and graphic designers, digital marketers, to name a few.

Why do I like Refrens?

The recent economic earthquake and the related job losses will give wings to the gig economy. Several platforms help gig workers promote their wares, but not many that will help them with organizing their back-end operations. The stellar angel investor star cast backing this deal should provide Refrens an edge over the indirect competition.

 

Name: Log9 Materials

Amount Raised: USD 164K from Deepak Ghaisas

What does Log9 do?

Edited from Traxcn: Log9Materials is a startup in the nanotechnology space. It focuses on graphene-based materials. Also, it undertakes custom synthesizing orders. R&D is centered on energy-efficient technologies based on graphene derivatives. As of November 2016, the company is developing graphene quantum dot-based LEDs and foldable displays and graphene composite based water purification systems. They have developed ‘Smoke-Free’- graphene-based cigarette filter and claims to reduce the risk of getting cancer by 90%.

Why do I like Log9?

I had looked at Log9 in the past when they were utilizing graphene-based technologies for fuel cells & filtration. However, their new product, CoronaOven could get serious traction as the importance of disinfecting things before using or consuming them is taken seriously. If the technology works as it is supposed to, there is a massive market for this product.

 

Name: Scribble Data

Amount Raised: Undisclosed from unnamed Angels

What does Scribble Data do?

Edited from Traxcn: Their platform, Enrich, helps prep data at scale (feature engineering) for data science, and our consulting services are aimed at turning every data science team into well-oiled machines.

Why do I like Scribble Data?

ML engineers love challenges. These engineers take on projects that test their skills and will build their reputation. Eventually, the projects get completed, and they venture out to find a new challenge, and the cycle repeats – but there could be a better solution. Scribble Data’s ML engineering as a service could offer exciting projects to keep ML engineers engaged but, at the same time, provide continuity at a more affordable & flexible payroll for the company. I have asked a couple of my portfolio company’s to reach out to Scribble and test out this hypothesis – the proof will be in the pudding.

Summarizing my exit interview with a venture capital intern 

Two interns finished their learning cycle with Artha this week. One of them wanted to speak to me and get my feedback on his performance during his 4month internshipThe schedule short feedback session went on much longer, and at the end of it, we got into an exciting topic – the importance of forming an opinion.  

I believe our discussion applies to anyone who wants to work in the investment business, especially earlystage venture capital. I am sharing a synopsis of that conversation with the permission of the intern.  

 

Intern: What is one piece of advice for me? 

Me: Form an opinion and be vocal about it. It is acceptable to be wrong, completely wrong, and heinously wrong. However, it is cardinal mistake to have the ability to accumulate and analyze data but lack the courage to form a decisive opinion. The best investors have often sought out views from their peers and from people who could provide them with a fresh perspective. In fact, the investors I emulate often seek out contrarian views to their own to test their hypothesis.  

 

Intern: Why is the trait of forming and communicating our opinions so important? 

believe that investing is the ability to predict future outcomes of current decisions, and an investor’s brilliant foresight finds appreciation only in hindsight. That is why I consider investing more of an art than scienceA room full of experienced appreciators of art would almost inevitably have deep-felt disagreements on the value of Van Gogh. They could all be right or be wrong – we would only find out once the money gets transferred into the sellers account 

 

What should an intern do?  

fondly remember eyeopening realizations I have had during discussions (sometimes heated) with interns, associates, principalspartners, coinvestors, and even entrepreneurs over the last 10 years in venture capital. Initially, it was intimidating for me to showcase my opinions in front of the experienced hands of this game. But I realized that I wasnt learning anything by keeping them to myself. I learned more by expressing my incorrect opinions and recognizing the gaps in my understanding, over keeping my opinion to myself for fear of getting called out.  

A newcomer to the investment industry should seek out experiences where they can form these opinions. Join investment clubs, seek out investors who have strong opinions, even if they are contrarians to their own, but learn how to build and present your investment viewpoint. 

 

Don’t be afraid of being wrong; we learn best through the mistakes we make. Expressing your opinion is a win-win situation. You either get called out and learn where you went wrong, or your opinion contributes valuably to the discussion. Most importantly, you grow with each interaction and learn to receive constructive criticism. 

My Favourite Funding News from Last Week (w20)

There is a slow recovery in the funding of early-stage startups. We are still a long way away from the heydays of 2018-19, but the growing pace of activity in angel networks & early-stage funds are promising signs.

After shortlisting the early-stage deals for week 20 from Traxcn, Inc42, and YourStory, we picked out the following as the best funding picks for the last week:

 

Name: Vernacular.ai

Amount Raised: USD 5.1 mn led by Exfinity Ventures and Kalaari Capital

What does Vernacular.ai do?

Edited from Traxcn: Vernacular.ai is an AI platform to manage customer engagement and call center automation solutions. It provides multi-lingual chatbots for automating customer service operations of enterprises using natural language processing and deep learning. Natural language processing helps the bots to extract meaning, context, and entities of incoming messages, thereby enabling companies to interact and engage in any language with customers.

Deep learning helps in pre-training the bot with domain corpus and augmenting with enterprise-specific data to achieve maximum accuracy for the same. The bots developed using the platform can be deployed to multiple omnichannel platforms, including Facebook Messenger, Twitter, Website, Mobile, among others. Some of the supported languages include Hindi, Gujarati, English, to name a few. Clients include Vistaar, Shriram General Insurance, Exide Life Insurance, and Barbeque Nation.

Why do I like Vernacular.ai?

Voice AI has enormous applications in a world where customer service standards aren’t keeping up with the expectations of customers. Customers want to get personalized treatment and in a language that they are comfortable conversing in. As an early investor in vPhrase, I have seen the vast revenue potential of applying artificial intelligence for customer communication.

 

Name: Mintoak

Amount Raised: USD 2 mn led by Pravega Ventures

What does Mintoak do?

Edited from Traxcn: Mintoak offers a POS solution called DOV that enables merchants to accept digital payments. The solution involves a POS hardware device along with software solutions. Merchants can accept various types of card payments, such as magstripe, EMV, NFC, and secure PIN. It also enables the acceptance of UPI payments. Merchants can also accept payments without internet connectivity through their patent-pending technology that allows a POS to the transaction to be completed using the voice channel, thereby improving transaction completion rates. It also offers a consolidated view of all transactions handled by the device.

Why do I like Mintoak?

Except-Jio, most mobile operators operate on seriously inadequate infrastructure to handle the bandwidth demands of India fintech companies in urban centers. I shudder to imagine how vendors in Bharat, where the network infrastructure is weaker, would cope up. Mintoak attempts to use a data-light technology to process transactions, thereby decreasing costs and improving efficiency – an actual Bharat-focussed tech play.

 

Name: MetaMorphoSys

Amount Raised: Undisclosed amount led by Good Capital

What does MetaMorphoSys do?

Edited from Traxcn: MetaMorphoSys Technologies provides a software suite for the insurance industry. It offers solutions for product development, claims management, risk management, and more. It also features software for insurance quoting, sales & marketing, underwriting, and more.

Why do I like MetaMorphoSys?

Insure-tech will be one of the biggest beneficiaries of the post-COVID environment. A CRM focussed on increasing the sales & marketing ability of insurance agents will be a need-to-have utility. Hitting a ₹50 lakh monthly SaaS revenue will be the first port-of-validation for MetaMorphoSys!

My funding picks of last week (w18)

Fundraising activity continues to slow down; therefore, my team and I had a tough time shortlisting our favorite picks with just a handful of deals to choose from. After shortlisting all early-stage deals activity for week 18 from Traxcn, Inc42, and YourStory, we jointly picked out the following as the best funding picks for the last week:

 

Name: QuillBot

Amount Raised: $4 Mn in a round led by GSV Ventures and Sierra Ventures

What does QuillBot do?

Edited from Traxcn: Millions trust QuillBot’s full-sentence thesaurus to get creative suggestions, rewrite content, and get over writer’s block. QuillBot uses state-of-the-art AI to rewrite any sentence or article you give it.

Why do I like QuillBot?

My team and I are Grammarly power users processing tens of thousands of words for our investment notes, meeting minutes, emails, blogs, private chats, and more. I believe that there is space for a Grammarly competitor, especially one that understands the Indianized English – also, can Quillbot (or Grammarly) build a plugin for PowerPoint, please!

 

Name: YAP

Amount Raised: $4.5 Mn led by BEENEXT

What does YAP do?

Edited from Traxcn: YAP offers a white label program management platform. They also issue a Yap Tatkal wallet, which allows their clients to provide their customers physical or virtual prepaid cards linked to their products. They also offer a QR payment solution in the mobile wallet.

Why do I like YAP?

The lockdown caught the banks with their pants down due to unpreparedness to go digital. The post-lockdown scenario is bleak for physical banking, and banks must prepare themselves to fully service their customers from the palm of their hands. YAP is building APIs to bridge that gap hence one to look out for.

 

Name: Mindhouse

Amount Raised: ~$680K from BTB Ventures, GGV Capital, Aartieca Family Trust, and Angels

What does Mindhouse do?

Edited from Traxcn: Standalone mental fitness and wellness center brand

Why do I like Mindhouse?

The COVID19 virus reserves it’s worst for those with weakened immune systems. Therefore I expect that fitness (physical or mental) will be on the priority list of most in the post-virus era. Mindhouse attempts to enter the space that mind.fit is operating in. Will it succeed?

Flashback Friday: United Mobile Apps

United Mobile Apps (UMA) developed and published mobile applications software. The company issued software products for mobile devices with a focus on connection management, device management, and data synchronization. UMA marketed its products and services to original device manufacturers throughout India.

UMA had a vision of enabling access to all the User’s data ‘Everything – Everywhere.’ To implement this vision, UMA worked on a cross-platform software called Unify (U5) which had the following modules:

  • USync: Synchronize data from mobile device / laptop / PC
  • UManage: Manage the device remotely
  • UShare: Share the backed-up data

 

Year of Investment: 2012 Total funding raised USD 1.2 Million
2020 status: Shutdown Number of rounds 2
Co-investors: Blume Ventures, India Venture Partners & Mumbai Angels

 

Anirudh A Damani (aD) gives his insight behind this investment.

  1. Why did we invest in UMA?

aD: UMA was trying to optimize the mobile telephony infrastructure by utilizing the correct cellular network bands based on the type of data getting transmitted. So, their solution allows the network operator to use 4G for rich data applications, 3G for emails, 2G for voice calls, and GSM for SMS. The solution also allowed a seamless offloading to wi-fi for data sapping applications.

It was the perfect solution for an infrastructure challenged market like India with its notoriously poor network quality. I also liked the founding team, the right mix of engineers, and businesspeople for a complex infrastructure play.

 

  1. What were the risks involved with an investment in UMA?

aD: There were a couple of significant risks. First, the company must invest a considerable amount of money on R&D, an expense that it could not stop even if sales were slow – which was the second risk. The company had a long sales cycle and relied on the correct alignment of several external factors for its success.

 

  1. How long did you plan to invest in UMA?

aD: For a long time, I  had a conviction that UMA would be my first unicorn. I had planned to hold onto it forever as UMA’s business model would make it a cash cow. Unfortunately, unfavorable market conditions dashed my expectations.

 

  1. What was the primary reason behind dead pooling UMA’s investment?

aD: As I had said earlier, the company relied on external factors for its success, e.g., the quick rollout of 4G networks to be a viable solution for network operators. The network operators would then ask handset makers to install UMA’s chip in the handset and pay a royalty to UMA per device per month.

However, the 2G spectrum allocation scam in India led to a slow 4G rollout in India. Though unconnected to India, different regions around the world also witnessed a slowdown in rolling out 4G. This stalled the company in its tracks. The company tried pivoting to a new business line, which met with moderate success, and it needed additional rounds of capital to survive the delays but failed at raising a new round.

 

  1. Are you satisfied with the efforts of the founders?

aD: Absolutely! I believe that the founders gave it their all, and factors beyond their control led to their eventual demise. I continue to have a ton of respect for the founders, and I look forward to investing in them once again!

 

  1. What mistakes did UMA make, and what was your learning as an investor?

aD: It would be incorrect to blame the founders for making mistakes for situations beyond their control. The most significant learning for me was to ensure that the founders held (at least) 60% equity before raising a Series A round.

 

  1. Would you invest in a similar startup today?

aD: Absolutely!

 

 

My Funding Picks of Last (two) Weeks (w13 & 14)

After the turbulence of the last few weeks, I finally carved out the time to share my funding picks of Week 13 & 14 of 2020.

My team and I shortlisted the deals for week 13 & 14 from Traxcn, Inc42, and YourStory and we jointly picked out the following as the best funding picks for 17th March to 29th March 2020 period:

 

Name: Qtalk

Amount Raised: $1.6 million from Accel India & Lightspeed Venture Partners

What does Qtalk do?

Edited from Traxcn: QTalk is a mobile application that provides calling for friends and family members. It allows users to make affordable local and international calls using phone internet/network or WiFi technology. Its features include call recording/history/remainders, caller ID, spam blocking, calendar integration, and others.

Why do I like Qtalk?

Qtalk brings an interesting tech layer on top of a regular dialup app providing smart features like silence overrides, shared browsing, and call intent. The app offers WiFi calling, which is a much-needed feature to overcome the overloaded network infrastructure in India today.

 

Name: MedCords

Amount Raised: ₹7 crores from InfoEdge India

What does MedCords do?

Edited from Traxcn: Medcords is a medical record management solutions provider for patients, doctors, pharmacies, and lab centers. Prescriptions, bills, personal information, etc. can be uploaded to the mobile app. Doctors can view the past medical history of patients and can access other medical records of the patients. Patients can view all information related to their health, and also pharmacies and labs can access the record to provide services to patients. Also, uses analytics and provides trends to doctors and patients

Why do I like MedCords?

Maintaining medical records is painful. To aggregate one’s medical information, prescriptions, blood reports, and past medical history into one space are even more painful. MedCords aims at solving this problem. It provides a one-stop solution for one’s medical needs, and once it reaches critical mass, the data analytics layers will pay rich dividends for the investor.

 

Name: PitStop

Amount Raised: $2.5 million from Group Landmark, Blume and Goldbell Group

What does PitStop do?

Edited from Traxcn: PitStop is a closed marketplace for car service providers. It provides an estimated cost of service and offers the option for doorstep pickup and delivery. Provides status tracking after booking service. They claim to have the service done in 2 hours. Pitstop has expanded to several locations including Delhi, Bangalore, Hyderabad, Mumbai, Pune, and others.

Why do I like PitStop?

I am not a big fan of the fragmented vehicular maintenance space. However, Pitstop’s substantial revenues numbers put them a cut above the rest. That is the reason why it is on my list. Pitstop wants to use the data reservoir created from its vast customer base to offer services like vehicular insurance, etc. If it can continue its phenomenal growth in the post-Corona phase – this one could be one to watch out!

 

PS: Artha Venture Fund invested in Agnikul, a deal that got announced a couple of weeks back. While I am a big fan of the team and the deal, I keep our investments outside the purview of these picks.

You can read Vinod and my reasons for investing in this detailed blog: Why We Invested in Agnikul?

Video Of The Week: Fyre- The Greatest Party that Never Happened

This week’s video was recommended by Karishma so a big thank you to her!

Fyre is the ultimate tool for entrepreneurs to learn that scaling before having a miniaturized working model is akin to gambling with the business. It should open the eyes of investors, entrepreneurs, managers and employees that scaling is the easiest part of building a venture. The billion-dollar question that needs to be answered is – can your business deliver consistently and profitability at scale?

Fyre also answers the question of how doing too many things can eventually lead to doing nothing or (in this case) land you and your business in legal hot water. I believe that Fyre’s founder, William “Billy” McFarland may not have intended to defraud his customers (unlike his investors, who he definitely did). It seemed as though he wanted to do everything that his marketing campaigns had promised but just could not control the monster that he built. Eventually, he went against the advice of his key team members and kept up a charade that transformed him from a boy genius to Mr. Evil.

This brilliant, moving and shocking documentary is available on Netflix.

21/2019